Column

Part 3

Yes we sold some items to some influential people. Just to name some, Fat Joe, Smooky MarGielaa, Terrence Jenkins,  ZillaKami, and Yu-Ming Wu. We also had Asa Akira and Joe Jonas stop by but unfortunately no purchases. I was hesitant to share who stopped by during our stay but they are part of our story. I am very grateful for them for stopping by whether they will remember Sneaky Tavern or not. Fat Joe took an early pair of Travis Scott Air Force 1s for his shoot for She's Gotta Have It. Terrence quietly slipped in minutes before we were closing to walk away with a Supreme Scarface tee. Yu-Ming Wu came in within my first month and copped a Supreme Zojirushi Mug. I played a game of rock paper scissors with Smooky to determine the price of the Off - White UNCs I was selling him for his performance. Shot out to the homie for helping him link with me. My favorite is ZillaKami because he was a regular. He had an infatuation with Takashi Murakami and always showed love at Sneaky purchasing items whether he really needed them or not haha. Even though these guys stepped into our shop, the people who really made my experience fun were the people who were my customers and consignors, who eventually became my workers. I will talk about them next week. They really held me down and kept me up during the slow days...

 

Part 2

January was a struggle. Sneaky Tavern was trash financially. I was working part time as a Finance Assistant out in Dumbo Brooklyn. To support myself I was working Mon - Fri from 8AM to 12PM, training it over to the Lower East Side to open up shop from 1PM to 10PM, getting home at Midnight just to have made only a total of 4 sales. I was doing everything on my own. Legit checking, being the runner, reaching out to consignors, social media, handling "sales". It was tough and draining but what kept me going was the customers. After a few weeks, I had people visiting me, showing love and support. I had the privilege of interacting with people from many different backgrounds. One thing I refused to do at times was to reach out to people who I knew prior. I did not want a false sense of support from people I knew prior because they wouldn't be the ones actually purchasing my product. I wanted it to be from the ground up brick by brick. I wanted to build a community of people who never met each other, who all equally shared a love for sneakers and streetwear. I never asked for anything from anybody, no backdoor, no bodies, nothing. There were times I refused to sell items to people! Money wasn't everything for me. I had a highschool girl sitting down on my bench counting the amount of hours she had to work to afford a Yeezy. I told her don't do it. I want you to walk out happy, not stressed. That was who I was. I guess my energy rubbed off on the right people because then I started to met some really, really, interesting people....

 

Part 1 

I was first approached with the idea of creating a sneaker / street wear consignment shop on December 12th, 2017. How do I remember the exact date? Well, its because I was invited over to have a meeting that day to discuss this concept and when I stepped out of the meeting, to my pleasure, sitting on my car's windshield underneath the wiper was a parking ticket. Already within the first hour of this idea, my first overhead cost was a $65 parking ticket. I didn't realize the meeting went over and that the meter ran out. Well, when there's a time stamp on your parking ticket saying your meter is out, and another car down the block has an authorized running meter ticket sitting on his dashboard, sharing is caring right? That's what my partner thought of and snapped a quick picture of the running meter ticket saying "Submit this photo pretending that this is your meter ticket and argue that you were wrongfully given a parking ticket." I did. It worked. So sneaky.

 

Sneaky.... Sneakers.... 

 

Hmm. Sounds like the first step to an origin story.